vcrfl
vcrfl:

Jean Fouquet: Virgin and Child Surrounded by Angels, 1452.
This was originally the right wing of the Melun Diptych, but the two panels are now in separate museums. The Virgin is believed to be an idealized portrait of Agnès Sorel, mistress of King Charles VII, who died two years earlier. Sorel was considered by many at the time to be “the most beautiful woman in the world” and therefore an obvious choice after which to model the Virgin.

vcrfl:

Jean Fouquet: Virgin and Child Surrounded by Angels, 1452.

This was originally the right wing of the Melun Diptych, but the two panels are now in separate museums. The Virgin is believed to be an idealized portrait of Agnès Sorel, mistress of King Charles VII, who died two years earlier. Sorel was considered by many at the time to be “the most beautiful woman in the world” and therefore an obvious choice after which to model the Virgin.

medievalpoc

medievalpoc:

medievalpoc:

Grandes Chroniques de France

f. 3r: Coronation of Pharamond

France (1332-1350)

Parchment codex.390 x 280 mm (text space: 255 x 190 mm).

British Library, London.

[x]

One of my patrons recently mentioned that my source links can sometimes be hard to see if you don’t know that they are there. For social media, I often truncate the source links like so: [x] to save space. The full link here, for example, is to the page for this manuscript, fully digitized and viewable, at the British Library’s website.

http://www.bl.uk/manuscripts/FullDisplay.aspx?ref=Royal_MS_16_G_VI

That link takes you to a page with the full information for that particular manuscript:

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If you scroll down, you’ll see what images are available for that manuscript. In this case, there are nearly a thousand:

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Clicking this will take you to the manuscript viewer, which allows you to read the manuscript as if you were holding it yourself!

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In addition to browsing, you can use the dropdown menu to go directly to the folio you want to see, in this case, folio 3r: The Coronation of Pharamond.

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You can then zoom in on text and images, as well as using the information at the top to read the description and notes on the text and images.

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And that, my friends, is what you get when you click the [x].